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Staying in touch!

Welcome to our blogs! A page where you will find a selection of articles, editorials, and human interest stories.
We strive to bring you information that will keep you in touch with the rest of the world and we offer you an opportunity to let the rest of the world keep in touch with you through your very own contributions.

you can make your own submissions at no cost and if your submission is chosen, it will be published along with your name and any other information that you wish us to publish.
All submissions will be reviewed to ensure appropriateness before they are published.
So, time for you to keep in touch!

Enjoy and don't forget to send your feedback to us at info@sterlingcreations.ca.!

Thursday, May 13, 2010

How sick must you be to earn a better diet?

Greetings!  I'm Nico Trimoff, manager of transcription and accessibility services at www.sterlingcreations.ca.
Today, I have an interesting article to share with you; one that should make you sit up and take note.
Please take a moment to read.
Enjoy your day!
 
 
How sick must you be to earn a better diet?
 
Catherine Porter
The Toronto Star , Dec. 12, 2009
 
Graphic: Dr. Roland Wong sees it as his duty to help the poor. "If you don't
help them, who the hell is going to help?" Dr. Roland Wong sees it as his
duty to help the poor. "If you don't help them, who the hell is going to
help?"
 
There is a little strip of paper taped to the door of Dr. Roland Wong's
dimly lit basement office. It reads:
 
"Special diet forms will no longer be filled when the clinic reopens on Nov.
1, 2009."
 
Still, people arrive while I sit in the meagre waiting room, like me hoping
to see the doctor. A Somali mother; an Iranian student; a Chinese man on
lunch break. I want to talk to Wong about the trouble he is in. They want
him to fill out the forms that have landed him in trouble.
 
"Look at this," Wong says, opening the beige paper the Somali mother has
handed him. "It's so complex, especially for a layperson, especially for
someone whose English is not so good. What the hell is dysphagia? Or
mastication?"
 
He stops for a minute and asks her gently: "How are your teeth?" They are
fine, she says. But she has stomach problems. She's on medication.
 
"You must go to your family doctor. Get him to go over this with you
slowly."
 
Wong cares about poor people. His practice is in Chinatown. He has a lot of
poor patients. He knows that a welfare payment of $572 a month is not enough
to pay for rent, transportation and food in this city. So he's done what he
can - he's filled many forms for the province's special dietary allowances,
ticking boxes for cardiovascular disease (which earn them an extra $10),
soya allergies ($83), diabetes ($42), chronic constipation ($10) and, yes,
"dysphagia/ swallowing or mastication difficulties" for people with no teeth
($25, plus a one-time $75 for a blender).
 
Word got out. A pilgrimage of poor people poured into his office, travelling
from Belleville, Kitchener, Windsor. So many came, he had trouble tending to
his regular patients. He started turning them away and instead worked at two
clinics set up by the militant anti-poverty group, the Ontario Coalition
Against Poverty.
 
There are three conclusions you could make here. Either these sick poor
people don't have family doctors, which is often the case. Or their doctors
aren't filling out the forms, because they are intimidated by the province's
strict policy around them.
 
Or these poor people aren't sick. They're thrifty. They know a good bargain
when they see it.
 
Facing a surge in special diet allowances - from $5 million in 2003 to $67
million today - the authorities suspected the latter.
 
Wong now faces a hearing before the College of Physicians and Surgeons. He
could lose his medical licence, or have it restricted.
 
The police have launched an investigation,too.
 
Wong says he hasn't bent the rules. Even at a clinic with 100 people a day,
he's done one-on-one consultations, asking people about their bowels, their
allergies, their medication. Some diagnoses are clear - you have diabetes,
show me your pills. Some, less so. "Chronic constipation - who can define
it, except me?" he says. "Soya allergy - it's not a clear medical condition.
I do the best to my abilities. If they lie to me, I can't change that. I
have
to trust the patient to a certain extent."
 
If they aren't really sick, chances are good they will be soon. People from
"food-insufficient households" are more likely to suffer from heart disease,
high blood pressure, food allergies and depression, according to Statistics
Canada's national health study. One-fifth of the poor suffered from three or
more chronic conditions.
 
In Ontario, poor women are four times as likely to get diabetes as rich
women.
 
There are many reasons for this. One of them is they don't eat well. They
can't afford to.
 
I met a 60-year-old woman on Friday who had eaten nothing but fried potatoes
for three days. There's a picture of her with all the food she ate over a
week: flour, onions, a single red pepper, a can of pineapples from the food
bank. Including the pitcher of tap water, there were 13 items on her little
kitchen table. I include more ingredients in a single Sunday night meal. She
already has diabetes, although she doesn't get the special allowance. The
city's medical Officer of health, Dr. David McKeown, recognizes this.
 
He's called on the province to boost welfare rates by $100 a month so people
can eat.
 
I look at it this way: today, there are 134,000 people getting extra petty
cash from the province for food. That's only 16 per cent of the people
receiving social assistance. Where are the other 84 per cent?
 
Where are their doctors?
 
We are robbing them of food.
 
Last week, the provincial government announced it had finally formed a panel
to review its welfare system. While they study, people eat nothing but
potatoes.
 
Raising rates will save us hospital bills in the long run. It will also make
us kinder.
 
"Why are you in the medical profession?" Wong says. "If you don't help them,
who the hell is going to help them? This is a fundamental social issue,
where the province has to raise the (social assistance rates) to help folks.
It's not something that can be corrected by one physician."
 
I don't know if Dr. Wong is bending the rules or not. But I think doctors
across the province should be bending them.
 
Catherine Porter's column runs on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. You can
reach her at cporter @ thestar.ca
 

If you would like to learn more about us and the services we offer, then please visit www.sterlingcreations.ca
If you would like to keep abreast of some of the most important happenings affecting your lives today, then please visit http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm.  There you will get the latest news roundups on such topics as:
Stress, anxiety, and depression. News for retirees, seniors, and aging baby boomers.  Security tips for home computer users.  Home business opportunities, Internet business opportunities, small business opportunities, business opportunities in Asia.  You will also learn how to obtain tremendous personal and financial satisfaction by selling your knowledge and experience.

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

A Beginners Guide To The Windows Command Line

Greetings!  I'm Mark Micheau, manager of research and translation services at www.sterlingcreations.ca.
Today, I have a very easy article for you to read; one that contains the basics of how to use the command line in Windows.
I hope you find it of use and I wish you a great day.
 
 
A Beginners Guide To The Windows Command Line
 
The command line is often a mystery to most of us. It looks a little scary.
 
In actuality it's a really useful tool to get things done in a hurry, cleverly disguised as something scary looking that only uber geeks use.
 
You can get the complete guide by visiting the link below.
 
 
The command line lets you communicate directly with your computer and instruct it to perform various tasks. For this you have to use specific commands. The commands are not necessarily intuitive, so they have to be learned, just like words in a language.
 
Fortunately, there are graphical user interfaces (GUIs) replacing most procedures that formerly required using the command line.
 
However, sometimes using the command line is quicker or even the only way to access certain information. Thus knowing how to use the command line can be extremely valuable.
 
And that's where this Windows command guide comes in.
 
To access the Windows command line in XP, click > START > Run, type cmd into the Open: field, and click OK.
 
windows command guide
 
Alternatively, you can go through > Start > All Programs > Accessories and select command prompt.
 
This launches cmd.exe, a window that reminds us of the old days in computer history:
 
pure white text on a uniform black background. Despite its resemblance to a DOS windows, cmd.exe merely is a command line interpreter merely similar to DOS.
 
guide windows commands
 
Now that you have successfully accessed the command prompt, what is there to do here?
 
To operate at command prompt level, you need to know some commands. Let me give you some basics to play with.
 
Help
 
First let me say that there is intrinsic help in the command prompt. If you're not sure whether a certain command really exists or what it does or what switches there are to it, type the command followed by a slash and question mark as in /? and you shall be enlightened.
 
Switches
 
Switches are optional extensions to a command, which change the command's behavior.
 
We actually saw an example of a switch in the previous section.
 
Using the symbols of slash and question mark together as in /? is a switch to any command, explaining its function rather than executing it in any way.
 
Note that you can add several switches to each command, but always leave a space between the command and each switch.
 
Now let's get on with serious commands.
 
dir
 
The dir command lists the contents of the current directory.
 
There are some useful switches to it. For example dir /d
 
(/d being the switch) will list the directory contents in up to three columns. Alternatively, you can use dir /w, which will sort the contents differently. With dir /p
 
the information doesn't scroll, but pauses at the end of the screen, until you hit a random key for the next screen full of data.
 
cd
 
To change directories, use the cd command.
 
Pick a directory seen in the previous dir listing. Directories are indicated by <DIR>
 
in the directory listing. For example type
 
cd desktop
 
and you will switch into the Desktop directory. Type
 
cd..
 
to return to the previous directory. To go directly to a specific directory, rather than haggling your way through each single one, type in the entire path. Let's say you went back to C:\> and want to return to the Desktop directory. Simply type
 
cd documents and settings\administrator\desktop.
 
Note that switching between drives doesn't require the cd command. Simply type in the respective drive letter and a colon, e.g. d: to switch.
 
mkdir
 
This one is used to make a directory, i.e. create a new directory. Type
 
mkdir name
 
to create a directory called name.
 
rmdir
 
To remove a directory, use this command. So that would be rmdir name
 
to remove a directory called name. Only empty directories can be removed.
 
You can of course create and delete directories located in any other directory, you just have to specify the respective path in your command, starting from where you are.
 
For example mkdir documents and settings\administrator\test when you're in C:\ or mkdir administrator\test if you're already in the documents and settings directory.
 
del
 
This is the command to delete files. It works similar to the mkdir and rmdir commands. So you type
 
del example.exe
 
to delete the file example.exe in your directory. If you're not already in the right directory, you add the respective path.
 
This was a short list of commands to make you familiar with the command line environment.
 
command prompt
 
We will now look at some very helpful commands for tasks that can not easily be completed by any other means. For all of them you can use the /? switch, to find out what all you can do with these commands.
 
driverquery
 
For a list of all drivers installed on your system, driverquery is the quickest solution.
 
ping
 
Ping must be the most popular command line prompt. It's used to check an IP address and see whether the respective computer is online or responding, i.e. whether network communication between your and that computer is possible.
 
ipconfig
 
Here you can reveal network data of your own computer, such as the name of your computer in the network, your IP address or your MAC address.
 
systeminfo
 
The command to retrieve extensive information about your system, including Windows serial number, computer model, and available RAM.
 
This Windows command guide can merely touch on the surface of what the command line can do.
 
Once again, here is the link to the complete guide.
 
 
If you have any questions about the tips posted in Dan's Tech tips, please contact Dan at the following email address:
 
 
_________________________
 

If you would like to learn more about us and the services we offer, then please visit www.sterlingcreations.ca
If you would like to keep abreast of some of the most important happenings affecting your lives today, then please visit http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm.  There you will get the latest news roundups on such topics as:
Stress, anxiety, and depression. News for retirees, seniors, and aging baby boomers.  Security tips for home computer users.  Home business opportunities, Internet business opportunities, small business opportunities, business opportunities in Asia.  You will also learn how to obtain tremendous personal and financial satisfaction by selling your knowledge and experience.

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

How to Make It Online as a Non-Native English Speaker

How to Make It Online as a Non-Native English Speaker | Zemalf.com
By Donna J. Jodhan
 
Yes indeed!  Despite the fact that English is still very much the global language of business both on and off the Internet, those aspiring non-native English Speakers who aspire to become translators, interpreters, and foreign language professionals should in no way give up hope.  There is room for everyone and what many persons often fail to take into account is this; non-native English speakers can definitely help companies to attract more customers and increase more revenues.  In addition, they can also help companies to expand their overall business operations.
 
How is this possible you may be wondering?  Well, the majority of today's world is made up of persons whose first language is not English and whereas in past tenses they were quite willing to use English as their main language of commerce, this is rapidly changing and now what we are seeing is a shift towards non-English speaking persons demanding to have services be provided in their own language.  So, enter the non-native English speaking professionals.  This shift is going to continue and become even more pronounced with time and in addition, non-native English speaking consumers are going to keep on demanding that services be provided in their languages in an efficient, professional, and appropriate manner.  No sloppy translations, no half way efforts, and no excuses.
 
I am going to provide you with an excellent reference to check out and I invite you now to read on. 
 
How to Make It Online as a Non-Native English Speaker | Zemalf.com
By Antti Kokkonen
Lost in Translation. For global businesses, the first language of choice is always English, all other languages are localization. The larger companies offer their services in multiple languages, as for some languages, like Spanish, Chinese or even French, there are plenty of people who understand and speak the language and it makes sense to offer services in these languages. But for tiny countries and languages like Finland and Finnish, the maximum audience we can reach ...
Zemalf.com -
http://zemalf.com/ 
 
 
I'm Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific day.
Donna J. Jodhan is the president of Sterling Creations
Now you can view blogs and editorials written by Donna at:
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com (Donna Jodhan!  Advocating accessibility for all)
http://www.diversityintheworkplace.ca (monthly editorial on issues concerning diversity)
 http://numpadplus.com/blog/?page_id=7 (access and accessibility)
http://www.accessibilitynews.ca/acnews/editorials/donna.php (accessibility issues in Canada)
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com (under the editorials section, an international perspective)
http://www.onestopbookcafe.com (under the cafĂ© talk link) 
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm (important answers to consumers concerns)
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/magazine.html (monthly editorial)
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog/blog.html (blogs for language professionals and accessibility consultants)

Monday, May 10, 2010

Jobs and careers identified

Greetings everyone!  I'm Jill Christiansen, manager of writing services at www.sterlingcreations.ca.  Today, I have some breaking headlines on what Uncle Sam is thinking when it comes to filling the gaps in its labor force.  I invite you now to read on; and I have more to share with you.
 
Week of May 08
Jobs and careers identified
 
So, who is Uncle Sam looking for these days when it comes to a particular type of skilled worker?
Why is Uncle Sam so desperate these days to plug this gaping hole?
Please read on.
Uncle Sam Wants Young IT Workers
IT Business Edge
So many jobs have been outsourced/offshored. The remaining jobs in the US are seeing a rapid ... not just the baby boomers, but the Net Generation, too. ...
Read more at:
http://www.itbusinessedge.com/cm/blogs/all/uncle-sam-wants-young-it-workers/?cs=39487
 
Can baby boomers do anything to re-invent their retirement?
If so, how difficult would it be?
Please read on.
10 Ways Baby Boomers Will Reinvent Retirement - US News and World ...
Here are 10 ways baby boomers' retirement will be different from their parents'. ... Careers that offer strong outlooks and high job satisfaction. ...
Read more at:
http://www.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/retirement/articles/2010/02/16/10-ways-baby-boomers-will-reinvent-retirement.html
 
Are you prepared for a career makeover?
Are you ready to embark on a new career path?
Please read on.
Career Makeover: From Sitcom Writer to Healthcare Healer - Careers ...
... and an increased demand for health care by aging Baby Boomers. ... Find a job in Health Care >>. Barbara Safani is the owner of Career Solvers, ... Tags: career change, CareerChange, healthcare careers, HealthcareCareers, ...
 Read more at:
http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2010/02/17/sitcom-writer-to-healthcare-healer/
 

If you would like to learn more about us and the services we offer, then please visit www.sterlingcreations.ca
If you would like to keep abreast of some of the most important happenings affecting your lives today, then please visit http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm.  There you will get the latest news roundups on such topics as:
Stress, anxiety, and depression. News for retirees, seniors, and aging baby boomers.  Security tips for home computer users.  Home business opportunities, Internet business opportunities, small business opportunities, business opportunities in Asia.  You will also learn how to obtain tremendous personal and financial satisfaction by selling your knowledge and experience.
 
 

Saturday, May 8, 2010

Our rights! Our future!

Greetings!  I'm Christian Robicheau, assistant editor at http://www.sterlingcreations.ca.  It is another gorgeous weekend shaping up and today I am pleased to introduce an editorial by our president Donna J. Jodhan.
Today, Donna has a message for us to pass on as the AGM conference of the AEBC fast approaches in Montreal. 
It is an inspirational message and I hope our readers find it to be so.
Have a great day and weekend.
 
 
Our rights!  Our future!   
 
As we approach the 2010 AEBC conference in Montreal, the time may have come for Blind, deaf/blind,  and vision impaired Canadians to do a bit of soul searching.  The theme of this year's conference "Our rights, our future" could not be more appropriate and fitting words at this point in time.  It seems to me that based on what I have been observing, a new era may be upon us; the winds of change may just finally be blowing in our direction.
 
There is an infamous saying that goes something like this:  "Opportunity knocks only but once."  Could this be our opportunity to reach out and grab our rights?  Could this be the time when we finally decide to take control of our destiny and our future?  Could this be the decision that we have all unconsciously made to stand up and be counted?    Are we ready to help make a difference and ensure that the future of our blind, deaf/blind, and vision impaired  kids will be a better and brighter future; one where more promises are fulfilled, where people are not afraid to speak up, and where we stand together for respect, commitment, and change?  Respect for ourselves, and for each other?
 
On May 03 2009, I had the privilege of being elected to the National board of the AEBC as your second vice president.  I was very humbled and very moved to have received this vote of confidence and since then I have had the opportunity to interact with so many new people and learn so many new things.  I have done my best to listen, learn, and understand and I have discovered that within our community, there is a wealth of skills, experience, and technically savvy persons; along with a growing group of doers and thinkers. 
 
There are battle scarred warriors who are still willing to share their knowledge.  Those who are willing to put themselves on the line if motivated enough, and finally the upcoming wiz kids who are just dying to assume their rightful places as voices and leaders of our organization.  However, we need to see more of our doers stepping forward to walk the long walk.
 
There will be many challenges to overcome, numerous bridges to build, and countless barriers to break down if we decide to legitimize our rights and protect our future.  It is going to be a lot of hard work but I have confidence that we can do it.  As one member so eloquently put it a few weeks ago; "Speak for yourselves."  We need to remember that Rosa sat so that Martin could walk and that Martin walked so that Obama could run and that Obama ran so that the kids could fly!
 
The date of May 03 is a kind of a mixed bag for me.  Not only was I elected to be your second vice president on that date, but it was the date in 2007 when I lost my beloved big brother Robert to the clutches of cancer.  Almost every day I remember Robert's last words to my sister-in-law and his doctor just before he left us; "Somebody do something!"  These are the words that our innocent blind, deaf/blind, and vision impaired kids are saying to us on a daily basis.  Those who are already here and those who will be here with us later on today, tomorrow, and onwards.  They are all innocent victims on the huge chessboard of life.  They have no one else to depend on but us; just as we had no one to depend on but those ahead of us and they did not let us down.  They fought for us and now we are obligated to continue the tradition.
 
So let us now go forward into the dawning of a new era!  It's time for us to claim our rights and protect our future.  Stand up and be counted!  It's time for us to believe in ourselves and if we believe then others will soon believe!
 
Best wishes for a wonderful spring and summer
Donna J; your second vice president
 
 
I'm Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific day and weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca and I would be delighted to send you an electronic copy of our latest newsletter.
 
Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna's blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan!  Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com 
a weekly feature on important answers to consumers concerns
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly blogs for language professionals and accessibility consultants
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog/blog.html
A monthly editorial on issues on diversity
http://www.diversityintheworkplace.ca
a monthly editorial on business issues and concerns
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/magazine.html 
weekly editorials on accessibility issues in Canada
http://www.accessibilitynews.ca/acnews/editorials/donna.php
Editorials:  An International perspective on issues of accessibility and disability
http://www.accessibilitynewsinternational.com (under the editorials section, an international perspective)
A general perspective on issues of access and accessibility
http://numpadplus.com/blog/?page_id=7 

Friday, May 7, 2010

Your best American cities

Hello there!  I'm Donna J. Jodhan, your virtual travel agent.  I'm happy to be with you once more and today I promise that our trip is going to be an exciting one. 
Are you ready for action?  Ready for a really nice plane ride?  Then buckle up and let's be on our way!
Enjoy!
 

Week of May 08 2010
 
Your best American cities
 
1. Gilbert Arizona
If you seek a city were old and new coexist, and where the Southern charm is still very much in existence, then welcome to Gilbert Arizona.
A city with sprawling ranches, lots of upscale shopping, and golf courses that are lush and green.
A city where leather boots are still worn and luxurious resort spas abound.
Gilbert is a safe city for all; for the family, for the young professional looking to get ahead, and for the retiree seeking peace and quiet.
Gilbert is made up of quiet residential neighborhoods with a variety of home styles that are extremely affordable.
 
2. Bellevue Washington
Are you seeking a city with a bit of affluence?
One that is very conducive for either raising a family or launching a career?
Then welcome to Bellevue Washington!
A clean green city with lots of parks, golf courses, and beaches.
Basketball, baseball, golf, hiking, and biking, all waiting for you to enjoy.
Bellevue is a picturesque city that offers you the chance to do it right.
 
3. Boston Massachusetts
What more can I say about Boston?
A city that offers you the opportunity to learn, grow, and flourish.
With excellent universities, wonderful and exciting sports teams, and lots of great attractions that are within walking distance of each other, this compact city is one of America's largest and oldest cities.
Boston reigns when it comes to cities that never sleeps.
Great night life, excellent dining, and a zoo and aquarium that are both a cut abovethe competition.
Why not put Boston on your list of places to visit this spring?
 
4. Riverside California
If you are seeking to live in one of America's safest and most livable cities, then you've found it right here in Riverside California.
As one of the largest cities in California, Riverside offers you homes to die for. 
From sprawling houses to spacious suburban homes; with magnificent views of rivers and mountains.
A city with lots of fresh citrus fruits at your disposal, and tons of outdoor activities to choose from.
Riverside offers you an opportunity to live close enough to Los Angeles.
This city is very progressive and is determined to beat its smog problem.
There is hiking, biking, mountain climbing, plus so much more for you to discover.
 

I'm Donna J. Jodhan bidding you a happy travel time.
Visit me at www.sterlingcreations.ca if you would like to learn more.
Or send me an email at donnajodhan@sterlingcreations.ca.

Thursday, May 6, 2010

Recognize Canada's missing millions

Greetings!  I'm Nico Trimoff, manager of transcription and accessibility services at www.sterlingcreations.ca.  It's the end of the week, almost, and I am going to end it with a very sobering article.  All about how Canada treats some of its less fortunate citizens. 
 I invite you now to read on.
Enjoy your day.
 
 
Recognize Canada's missing millions
 
Helen Henderson
The Toronto Star , Oct. 24, 2009
 
How is it possible for more than 4.5 million Canadian citizens to go
missing? Did they just drop off the map? Did anybody organize a search
party?
 
Michael J. Prince went looking for evidence that those in positions of power
give any thought at all to people with disabilities when formulating and
assessing policies. He found little beyond empty words.
 
Vast gaps in public awareness. Vacant promises from governments at every
level. Charitable platitudes from the corporate sector.
 
It all adds up to almost five million citizens effectively disenfranchised,
relegated to the farthest margins. When it comes to real, substantive
inclusion in policy-making decisions, they are simply missing.
 
Prince, a social policy professor at University of Victoria, has documented
it all in his latest book, Absent Citizens: Disability Politics and Policy
in Canada (University of Toronto Press). It is a bleak picture of policy
failure that translates into exclusion from workplaces and community
involvement.
 
Advocacy groups point out that Canadians with disabilities are more than
twice as likely to live in poverty as those without disabilities. More than
two million lack one or more of the supports they need for daily living.
More than half of children with disabilities do not have access to the aids
and devices they need.
 
"By ignoring people with disabilities, public and social policy builds
disablement into social structures and social programs," Prince points out.
 
Prince also found emerging voices from within the disability community
determined to shed light where it belongs. They are putting to rest old
notions of the disabled as sick, tragic figures struggling heroically to
overcome their shortcomings.
 
Dignity, worthiness, insight and ability are what it should be about, they
point out. Slowly but surely, they are influencing legislation and
empowering others. But there's a lot of work to be done.
 
"By ignoring disabilities as a central feature of structural inequalities in
Canada, social scientists naturalize disability-based inequities," Prince
notes.
 
Disability is emphasized as being biologically determined. But what about
the role played by a political system, and a society, that constructs
physical and attitudinal barriers rather than dismantling them?
 
Why don't we pay more attention to universal design, design that makes
physical and intellectual structures accessible to anyone who moves, or
communicates, or processes information differently from the majority?
 
"Rather than identifying clients as recipients who are dependent and
labelled 'unemployable,' public programs should relate to clients as
individuals, as participants with identifiable skills who desire
independence and often work," Prince says.
 
"In addition to providing necessary income support, they should have active
measures to promote training and skills development, employment and
volunteer opportunities."
 
Canada needs to "mainstream disability into public policy and
administration, " Prince argues. We need to build national statistics and an
"inclusion index." We need budget statements that commit to improving lives
for disabled people, and we need the media to report on the implications of
budgets and other policies for people with disabilities and their families.
 
Twenty years ago, there was hope that federal employment equity legislation
would lead the way to a more level playing field in the job market. But
progress under federal employment equity legislation has stalled, Prince
argues. As has progress toward a federal disability law.
 
Prince believes Canada needs more "positive-action legislation" in contrast
to anti-discrimination legislation that forces disability activists into the
courts to fight prejudicial practices one barrier at a time.
 
A federal disability act, promised for years by every party of every
political stripe, would be a good start to positive action. But, so far,
nothing has materialized.
 
On the subject of a federal disability law, the promise of the Stephen
Harper government - as it likes to refer to itself - is "vague, somewhat
muddled and incomplete," Prince argues.
 
"If the Harper government is developing an act, then the disability
community needs to engage in that process," he points out.
 
Couldn't agree more.
 
Helen Henderson is a freelance writer and disability studies student at
Ryerson University. Her column appears Saturdays. helenhenderson @
sympatico.ca
 

If you would like to learn more about us and the services we offer, then please visit www.sterlingcreations.ca
If you would like to keep abreast of some of the most important happenings affecting your lives today, then please visit http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm.  There you will get the latest news roundups on such topics as:
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